Confident Girls

The latest self-directed democratic educational resources curated by Alpine Valley School.


Quotes of the week:

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We came across this article in The Atlantic this week, which made us 😭😭😭, but it also made us profoundly grateful for self-directed democratic education: How Puberty Kills Girl's Confidence. To us, this article is even more evidence for why alternative education is so important. Here, we have no bad grades, and no pervasive issues with bullying. Issues are addressed head-on through our justice system and young women learn through these experiences that their voice matters. Young women at our school learn to take risks, knowing that they have the support of their community and that the staff members will be right there beside them.

This article from Peter Gray gave us the opposite set of feels, and lays out a real-life example about why less teaching leads to more learning for certain individuals. The traditional education system is not designed to serve the needs of every individual - the only system that can really do that is one designed by that individual.

If you want to find out more about how we accomplish that ideal at our school, come join us for an upcoming Meet & Greet on August 24th! Come and learn more about self-directed democratic education in the Denver area by touring our facility, meeting our staff members, and chatting with graduates of our program. Space is limited, so please reserve your spot if you plan to attend! Both current families and newcomers are welcome!

We're also loving this article from the Open School this week about what activities are "education" and "not educational". Here's a quote: "I think that alternative/Sudbury education is not a waiting game. I think that kids’ real education is happening now, every day, whether they’re studying, building, playing, talking, or just contemplating. I think that if you’re waiting for something to happen, waiting for your 7-year-old or 11-year-old or even 16-year-old to “do something” or “learn something”, you’re communicating that what they are doing is not worthwhile." (Cue the cheering and fist-pumping.)


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Marc Gallivan